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1. INFANT MORTALITY RATE

Definition: This indicator represents the infant mortality rate, which is the probability (expressed as a rate per 1,000 live births) of a child born in a specified year, and dying before reaching the age of one.

Significance: Infant mortality rates, in essence, measure “child survival.” They also suggest the socio-economic and environmental conditions in which children live, including their healthcare. Because data on the incidence and prevalence of diseases (morbidity data) frequently are unavailable, mortality rates are frequently used to identify vulnerable populations.”[i]

 

Historical/Trend Analysis, Infant Mortality Rate per 1,000 Live Births

Data reflect South Carolina (SC) average, United States (US) average, and Southeast (SE) average.  The southeast region consists of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Note: Infant mortality rates are the most commonly used index for measuring the risk of dying during the first year of life. The rates presented in this report are calculated by dividing the number of infant deaths in a calendar year by the number of live births registered for the same period and are presented as rates per 1,000 live births.

Source:   National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System

 

Selected State Rankings, 2007 (“1” represents state with highest infant mortality rate. States are ranked from highest to lowest using a standard competition ranking method that accounts for ties occurring when two or more states have the same infant mortality rate measured as the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births) 

SC

NC

GA

TN

MS

WA

4

6

9

7

1

50

8.6

8.5

8.0

8.3

10.0

4.8

 

 

 

2. BIRTH RATES AMONG TEENAGERS AGED 15-19

Definition: This indicator represents the number of live births per 1,000 women aged 15-19.

Significance: Over time, the birth rate for teens has declined.  However, experts agree that the rate continues to be a matter of concern. The indicator suggests the degree to which efforts to curb teen pregnancies have been effective.  In addition to the costs assumed by the mother, each baby born to a South Carolina teen costs taxpayers approximately $22,000 per year.

 

Historical/Trend Analysis, Birth Rates among Teenagers per 1,000 Estimated Population Aged 15-19

Data reflect South Carolina (SC), United States (US, and Southeast (SE) average.  The southeast region consists of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Source:   National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System

 

 

Selected State Rankings, 2008 ("1" represents state with highest birth rate among females age 15-19.  States are ranked from highest to lowest using a standard competition ranking method that accounts for ties occurring when two or more states have the same teen birth rate. Rates per 1,000 females age 15-19)

SC

NC

GA

TN

MS

NH

11

14

13

8

1

50

53.1

49.4

51.8

55.6

65.7

19.8

 

Rev. 04.15.2011

 

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